Whatever Your Age, It’s Never Too Late to Begin

By on April 16, 2014
senior couple working out

By Marjorie Jaffe –

Your chronological age may be climbing, but you feel as young as you used to be. It comes as a surprise when the jeans you’ve always worn have somehow, become too tight. You may have heard that, on average, you burn fewer calories each year and that after age 25, you will lose ½ pound of muscle and gain 1 pound of fat each year. But take heart! These statistics are only true for sedentary people, and there is no reason to assume that as you get older you will necessarily become sedentary. That is purely a choice – your choice.

In fact, if you start right now to establish and maintain a good level of fitness, you’ll have little impulse to be or become sedentary. Remember, there is now an epidemic of more than 6 million kids who are significantly overweight as the result of being seriously (and unfortunately) sedentary.

The Way You Look
One reason people can get fatter as they age is that their metabolism decreases and they burn fewer calories. Aerobic exercise raises your burn rate, but what stands in the way of a person starting, and then, maintaining an aerobic workout that we know is a great way to lose weight? (1) Your body isn’t in shape: Well, if you’re back hurts, you can’t really enjoy going on the treadmill. If you feel stiff, even walking can be a burden. (2) Results take to long to get And then, consider, that it takes 3500 calories expended to burn off 1 pound. So, consider this: you could struggle through a week of treadmill workouts and lose only1 pound?

The biggest reason is results don’t come fast enough. And that’s true about weight if you consider that each pound of weight is equal to 3500 calories. In order to lose weight you have to burn (put out) more calories than you ingest (put in).

With the “Muscle Memory Method”
YOU WILL GET
> Tighter Muscles
> More Flexible Joints
> Stronger Bones

You’ll Discover how to:
RE – connect with your body
RE – set your muscles
RE -wire the mind to body pathway

The most important thing when approaching exercise is to understand what you’re doing, so after your workout, you can transfer everything you did to your every day life. For example, if you did a neck muscle strengthening exercise, you can use that neck muscle to keep your head lifted tall – which pulls up your entire body — rather than having a crunched neck; with the rest of your body sagging. Need I ask which all of us would prefer!

Tighter Muscles
When you know the name, the location and what it does…
More flexible joints
Visualize the construction of the joints; know where they are and * know the muscles surrounding the joints. Bone to bone is with ligament; muscle to muscle is with tendon; (not much of a blood supply)wish we could oil them with a squirt can, but for now, let’s keep them mobile and flexible
Stronger bones
Every time a muscle pulls on a bone, a bone gets stronger

Our goal is for you to concentrate as you exercise in order to make these muscle habits permanent. And with a little bit of knowledge, that you can’t expect to know if you haven’t been to medical school, you’ll now be able to train yourself and maintain your muscle tone all the time.

Just consider this – if you didn’t know how to swim, would you jump off a boat in the middle of the ocean? No way. But, mostly everyone goes into exercise not knowing anatomy, physiology or kinesiology. Believe me, exercising correctly is not like advanced physics, but it will be so helpful for you to know the names of the muscles you’re using; where they are located in the body; and, how it feels when you are using them. This is similar to meeting a new person that you want to remember – what is their name? – where do they live? – what do they do. Knowing this, you won’t forget them, even if you meet them in your town and bump into them in France. How about forming a good relationship between you and your body and your mind!

Marjorie Jaffe, owner of Back in Shape exercise studio in NYC & lifelong fitness expert, is the author of a number of books including, The Muscle Memory Method, Get Your Back in Shape and Albert the Running Bear’s Exercise Book, as well as a Reader’s Digest Books contributor.  She was trained by Dr. Sonya Weber; founder of Columbia Presbyterian’s Posture and Back Care Clinic, and she served for ten years as head instructor for the YWCA Backcare program. Website: http://marjoriejaffe.com.

 

About Marjorie Jaffe

Marjorie Jaffe, owner of Back in Shape exercise studio in NYC & lifelong fitness expert, is the author of a number of books including, The Muscle Memory Method, Get Your Back in Shape and Albert the Running Bear’s Exercise Book, as well as a Reader’s Digest Books contributor. She was trained by Dr. Sonya Weber; founder of Columbia Presbyterian’s Posture and Back Care Clinic, and she served for ten years as head instructor for the YWCA Backcare program. Website: http://marjoriejaffe.com.

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Whatever Your Age, It’s Never Too Late to Begin