Low-cost, no cost methods to market your business

By on August 1, 2011

image of words related to marketing and businessBy Robbi Hess –

When you’re an entrepreneur, time is money and you need to keep track of every dime that comes in and goes out. It’s a delicate juggling act when trying to determine toward which marketing avenues to target those precious marketing dollars.

Here are a few suggestions that entrepreneurs can use to make the most of both their time and their marketing budget:
1. Make the best use of social media platforms. If your business doesn’t have a Facebook business page, you need to build one and start driving traffic to it. Make your business page as elaborate or as simple as you’d like; the main point is to get your business name in front of clients and potential clients. Once it’s built, you need to update regularly and interact with potential clients.
2. Get work through networking. These events are a great way to exchange business cards and build your network. Make the most of networking by uncovering a need that an acquaintance might have and determining whether your business can fill that need. Don’t let more than three days pass from the event until the time you make contact.
3. Don’t be afraid to ask for referrals from satisfied clients. Networking with strangers may lead to some work, but being referred to a potential new client from a current one is the best word-of-mouth.
4. Set yourself apart as an expert. Start a blog. Answer questions in LinkedIn discussion groups. If you’re not a member of LinkedIn, you need to sign up now. Comment on blogs in your industry, offer yourself up as a speaker at local networking events. Send press releases to the local newspaper, make sure it is relevant and contains information useful to readers – not simply an advertisement for your business. Consider this, if it’s National Sleep Month and you run a sleep clinic, you can write a press release on how to get a better night’s sleep – useful information while still getting your name out there.
5. Don’t lose sight of your current clients. In the rush to build a clientele, entrepreneurs neglect their current customer base. It is less expensive to keep a current client happy than it is to cultivate a relationship with a new one.
6. Offer business cards that leave a lasting impression. Rather than offering a traditional business card, hand out sticky notes with your business card information on them. Offer a business card notepad with your contact information. Imagine that an individual you met has your notepad by the telephone and sees it every day. That kind of advertising is priceless.
7. When’s the last time you sent your clients or prospects a postcard? Design a postcard, stick on a stamp and send a personal message. You can use postcard mailings to offer a coupon, a time-sensitive offer or a percentage-off-if-you-refer-a-friend. Email and electronic newsletters fill individuals’ inboxes on a daily basis but a piece of actual mail will make you stand out.

Remember, marketing isn’t something that you do on occasion; it is an ongoing part of doing business. Potential clients have short memories and you want to be the one they think of when the need arises.

Professional blogger, social media expert, editor and creative thinker, Robbi Hess helps individuals and small business owners define their key message and express it through their website presence, newsletters, blogging and other on-line and print media. Connect with her at http://www.robbihess.com/ or Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/robbi.hess.

About Robbi Hess

Professional blogger, social media expert, editor and creative thinker, Robbi Hess helps individuals and small business owners define their key message and express it through their website presence, newsletters, blogging and other on-line and print media. Connect with her at www.robbihess.com or Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/robbi.hess

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Low-cost, no cost methods to market your business