Loss or Blessing?

By on November 11, 2011

Roinson Crusoe and his man FridayBy Lynn Mosher –

Thanksgiving. Do we really give thanks? Maybe we should do as Robinson Crusoe did.

In searching for something new to write about for Thanksgiving, I came across the writings of Daniel Defoe and his classic, fictitious character Robinson Crusoe, which was published in 1719.

Defoe based Crusoe on the real-life experiences of Scotsman Alexander Selkirk, who went to sea in 1695.

In 1704, he was a sailing master under the command of William Dampier. As the ship he was on sailed past an island group, Selkirk demanded to be let off for fear that a battle with the Spaniards would sink the ship. The crew cast him off with only his clothing, a gun, a few tools, tobacco, and a Bible.

In the book, while on the island, Crusoe became despondent. He wrote, “I daily read the word of God, and applied all the comforts of it to my present state. One morning, being very sad, I opened the Bible upon these words, ‘I will never, never leave thee, nor forsake thee.’ Immediately it occurred that these words were to me; why else should they be directed in such a manner, just at the moment when I was mourning over my condition, as one forsaken of God and man? ‘Well, then,’ said I, ‘if God does not forsake me, of what ill consequence can it be, or what matters it, though the world should all forsake me, seeing on the other hand, if I had all the world, and should lose the favour and blessing of God, there would be no comparison in the loss?’”

He decided to make a list. He wrote…

“I now began to consider seriously my condition, and the circumstances I was reduced to; and I drew up the state of my affairs in writing, not so much to leave them to any that were to come after me – for I was likely to have but few heirs – as to deliver my thoughts from daily poring over them, and afflicting my mind; and as my reason began now to master my despondency, I began to comfort myself as well as I could, and to set the good against the evil, that I might have something to distinguish my case from worse; and I stated very impartially, like debtor and creditor, the comforts I enjoyed against the miseries I suffered, thus:-

“Evil: I am cast upon a horrible, desolate island, void of all hope of recovery.
Good: But I am alive; and not drowned, as all my ship’s company were.
Evil: I am singled out and separated, as it were, from all the world, to be miserable.
Good: But I am singled out, too, from all the ship’s crew, to be spared from death; and He that miraculously saved me from death can deliver me from this condition. [He was rescued five years later.]
Evil: I am divided from mankind – a solitaire; one banished from human society.
Good: But I am not starved, and perishing on a barren place, affording no sustenance.
Evil: I have no clothes to cover me.
Good: But I am in a hot climate, where, if I had clothes, I could hardly wear them…
Evil: I have no soul to speak to or relieve me.
Good: But God wonderfully sent the ship in near enough to the shore, that I have got out as many necessary things as will either supply my wants or enable me to supply myself, even as long as I live.”

On and on he went. For every negative aspect, he found a positive aspect for giving thanks. Sometimes, we may find ourselves on an island of despair and self-pity like Crusoe. If so, what happens to our praise and thanksgiving?

Scripture tells us, “I will bless the Lord at all times; His praise shall continually be in my mouth.” (Ps. 34:1 NKJV) And “Rejoice always…in everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” (1 Thess. 5:16, 18 NKJV)

If this is God’s will, do we obey it?

Make out a list this Thanksgiving, and for every negative in your life, find a positive.

May you be a Robinson Crusoe this season. I pray this year’s Thanksgiving will be filled with a full list of positives for each of you.

Thanksgiving blessings, Lynn

At a time of physical upheaval in 2000, Lynn felt led of the Lord to take up her pen and write. With this new passion, she has embraced her mission to reach others through Christ-honoring literature, encouraging them in their walk and offering comfort through the written word. Lynn lives with her hubby of 45 years in their Kentucky nest, emptied of three chicklets, and expanded by three grand-chicklets, and an inherited dog. You can find her at her blog at: http://lynnmosher.blogspot.com.

 

Lynn Mosher

About Lynn Mosher

At a time of physical upheaval in 2000, Lynn felt led of the Lord to take up her pen and write. With this new passion, she has embraced her mission to reach others through Christ-honoring literature, encouraging them in their walk and offering comfort through the written word. Lynn lives with her hubby of 45 years in their Kentucky nest, emptied of three chicklets, and expanded by three grand-chicklets, and an inherited dog. You can find her at her blog at: http://lynnmosher.com/.

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Loss or Blessing?